employable me

WA Today: TV viewers bite back, week of April 19

A job well done

Employable Me is currently the best show on free to air TV. To meet the candidates for employment who have neuro diverse conditions is a privilege. At times humorous, quirky, painful, and brilliant, their stories are deeply moving and expand our knowledge of what is is to be human. Good luck to Tim, Rohan and Kayla and their families. I have a lasting image of Tim smiling, his eyes shining when he was offered a job which suited his unique skills. A man of few words, his eyes said it all. - Lynne Boyd, Brighton East

The Conversation: Employable Me has struck a chord but will it change employers’ attitudes to disability?

IMG_0313.JPG

“I’m glad you can make use of my weapons grade autism”, laughs Jonathon in the ABC TV series Employable Me. He has landed a competitive paid internship, channelling his passion for accountancy. As well as a love of numbers, he has a wicked sense of humour and a way with words. And his sentiment is in line with the theme of the series, which promotes harnessing the strengths of its participants, rather than focusing on what they cannot do.

Mumbrella: ABC documentary Employable Me Australia edges towards Ten’s Hughesy We Have a Problem

EMP_JONATHAN_EP3_3.JPG

As Seven continues its TV ratings winning streak with the Commonwealth Games, the battle between other programs has tightened. The ABC show Employable Me entered OzTam’s overnight preliminary ratings top 20 with a metro audience of 400,000 metro viewers, not far behind Dave Hughes' show Hughesy with Have a Problem.

Sydney Morning Herald: After MAFS, MKR, The Bachelor, ABC new series Employable Me redeems reality TV

Sydney Morning Herald: After MAFS, MKR, The Bachelor, ABC new series Employable Me redeems reality TV

At a time when so much commercial TV is bereft of diverse casts and stories, this ABC series about people with neuro conditions looking for work is all the more commendable.